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Question on Rocket M2 and M5 capabilities

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KE0RSX
KE0RSX's picture
Question on Rocket M2 and M5 capabilities

Hi, everyone,

I've been asked this and I'm 99% sure I know the answer but I want to confirm. On the Ubiquiti Rocket M2 (and M5) and other devices with two antenna ports (like the TP-Link WBS-series), are both antennas capable of sending and receiving data at the same time? In other words, can both antennas be pointed in different directions or is there a benefit to pointing them in the same direction?

Thanks, and have a great day. :)
Patrick.

nc8q
nc8q's picture
antennas different directions: Search
KE0RSX
KE0RSX's picture
I'm wondering about a different direction (pun intended)

So, in reading the comment and thread you pointed to, along with watching a video from Craig Mullins on YouTube, I'm thinking we need three different nodes on the tower, each pointing in a different direction (one on each leg is planned). So now, my questions are: Can they all be on the same channel, assuming that each one has two antennas (one vertically polarized and one horizontally polarized)? And if the answer is "no", can they be connected together using any type of switch, or does it have to be a managed switch? (I"m assuming it can be any switch).

Thanks again, and have a great day. smiley
Patrick.

AB7PA
Think through your channel plan

You might want to review this section of the AREDN docs and think about establishing a channel plan for your sites. https://arednmesh.readthedocs.io/en/latest/arednNetworkDesign/channel_pl...

nc8q
nc8q's picture
A new topic deserves a new thread.

I have not seen that video so I have not a clue from where your new thread is coming.
Do you have 3 or more users each in a different direction?
Fact: Yes, they can all be on the same channel, but ...
Practical: Not recommended. They will interfere with each other.
All AREDN devices can be linked (DtD'ed) with a simple switch, but adding services may be awkward.
Depending on the management or VLAN programming, they can be made to not work.
At first glance, it seems to me, that you are constructing a
simplex half-duplex hsmm network controlled by computer transmissions to mimic a
full duplex dual channel ham repeater with human controlled transmissions.
?
Chuck

 
 

KE0RSX
KE0RSX's picture
They're all part of the same theme. But it may need a new thread

Thank you for the reply Chuck. Here's the video I was referring to https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kACv5GlawAA&ab_channel=CraigMullins In it, they talk about how the antennas are both horizontally and vertically polarized. My original assumption was each antenna was completely independent, so they could be pointed in opposite directions (NW and S for example). Which led to my second question.

The situation that we have is, we've got three nodes on a tower in our town. We're trying to connect to one other town for sure, maybe two. The Rocket will be on a tower in between them, which is why I asked the original question. In reality, we're going to need something else for a backbone, but this is our first attempt, so to speak. Our ultimate goal is to have a full network between a few towns that can provide voice, email, video of potential flood areas, and other services. Also, we may have a need for portable nodes throughout the area. That's long-term though. Right now, we're just trying to get things up and running to demonstrate the capabilities.

I hope that explains what I'm interested in doing. And if it needs an entirely new thread, I'll gladly start one and link back to this one for context.

Thanks, and have a great day. :)
Patrick.

nc8q
nc8q's picture
Goal: full network between a few towns

Hi, Patrick:

 So, we completely understand that the dual stream devices expect that the antennas are pointing the same direction.

 'full' network?

 Perhaps we should consider building a network between a few towns and, as a aside, include the three nodes that exist at one site.

Much of hsmm depends on RF paths.
It all but impossible to give good advice when one does not know what the those 3 nodes are or
the location of the sites of the few towns and the height above ground and distance between those undefined towns and sites.

 Perhaps, if you looked at some existing networks, the concept of linking towns would be clearer.
  https://www.arednmesh.org/forums/maps .
Any part of those existing network maps match anything like your few towns?

Chuck

AJ6GZ
Ant

It sounds like you have a tower in between two towns to get line of sight to link them together? The proper solution here is a pair of MIMO dishes/panels, one in each direction. This also means two radios on two frequencies. You can get a RocketDish for your existing rocket. Other options are a PowerBeam M5 400 or the Mikrotik LHG series to name a few. There are also many 3rd party dishes/23db diectional panels out there. Splitting a radio's MIMO ports in two direction won't work. The math going on in the radio isn't designed for that. All this should happen on 5Ghz. Use 2Ghz only for low-level stuff amongst buildings, town square, and such.

In town, the best solution is another dish to point at your back-to-back middle tower site, and use your sector(s) only for client links. It is possible to point at a sector with a middle dish (good enough to test with for now) but you'll get much better performance with a dedicated dish-to-dish link ie: a backbone.

As usual...avoid Omnis!

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