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Airgrid M2 2G20

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W8MRL
W8MRL's picture
Airgrid M2 2G20

I'm about to buy the following and wanted confirmation that they can be flashed.  As I read the list, they can be.  They are airGrid M2 HP AG-HP-2G20
Can someone more knowledgeable confirm it for me?

Thanks,

Rob

AE6XE
AE6XE's picture
Rob,

Rob,

There is a possibility, if you purchase new, of receiving an XW hardware model of this device.  The Ubiquiti specs show 64Mb for all these AirGrid models.  The XM older hardware models had 32Mb RAM.   We've not seen the XW model in 2Ghz that I now of, but if we do, it is straight forward and we can do an iteration in a nightly build to ensure coverage.

However, using a single antenna device does come with some drawbacks.  While you can get a single polarized strong signal into a tower/cell site,  generally the equip at these sites are dual antenna.   What these means is that your device will only be receiving ~half the power.   MIMO devices transmit the same data and split the power on both polarized antennas, when using the MCS0 to MCS7 802.11 rates when transmitting to single antenna devices.   You would not receive very much of the signal 90 deg off of your polarity.   You would be at a disadvantage compared to purchasing a MIMO device, like the PBE power beam devices.

Joe AE6XE  

W8MRL
W8MRL's picture
These are older units so I'm

These are older units so I'm sure they would have 32 MB of RAM. The cost is low enough that I can share to get people going, then they can upgrade as the usage increases. I'm getting 5 x AG-M2HP (2006-2011) antenna feed 5x Feed Extender 5x Grid Reflector (17x24) 5x Rear Housing 5x L-Bracket 5x Pole Clap and U-Bolt 5x PoE(24V, 0.5A) + Power Cord x20 M6-16 bolts for $200.00.  Hopefully I'm not making a $200.00 mistake. :-)

AE6XE
AE6XE's picture
I've found 2Ghz has the most

I've found 2Ghz has the most limitations of the bands.    It has only 1 x 10Mhz usable channel  on  -2.    Using  ch 1+ in part 15  has high noise and not that usable.    As the network grows over time, there are no other channels  to separate groups and links, have to buy different hardware.    ch -2 still has more noise (compared to 3Ghz and 5Ghz part 97 channels)  which translates to less thoughput of data and higher latency, which impacts voip phone.    If this is the fist equipment to invest in for an area, you might consider 5Ghz --  cost comparable to 2GHz, but has many clearer sailing channels for growth.    See this ~comparable option with MIMO:

https://www.ebay.com/itm/Ubiquiti-Nanobridge-M5-NB-5G25-MIMO-802-11n-Outdoor-PtMP-Radio-5-Pack-25DBI-KIT/202420334069?epid=1500371663&hash=item2f21312df5:g:GdIAAOSwtbtbYL3P

...another half price -- 10 units for $26/unit:  https://www.ebay.com/itm/Ubiquiti-NanoBridge-M5-10-pack/273207531571?has...

Joe AE6XE

K6AH
K6AH's picture
+1

+1

W8MRL
W8MRL's picture
I'll keep an eye out for 3

I'll keep an eye out for 3 and 5 GHz units going forward.  We are severely hampered by hills and trees, it is very difficult to get clear line of site so we're starting small and also trying to drive interest. I definitely expect upgrades to be needed going forward.

AE6XE
AE6XE's picture
The economic theory/facts of meshing

If individuals invest in the 5Ghz equipment, this is all they really need in the long term with a number of channels available to isolate/optimize with growth.  It keeps cost to a minimum for everyone.   In the non-metro areas, the entire system  of cells, QTH nodes, uplinks, and backbones can fit in the available 5GHz channels.  However, in my area, we are and will run out of enough channels (ATV has some locked up) on 5GHz. 

3Ghz is higher cost equipment since it is not available in the US without a license and not part 15.   If more channels will be needed beyond 5GHz, then deploy 3Ghz for the P2P uplinks and backbone links.  It means this higher cost of equipment is incurred by fewer people and in many cases can be a group/club shared cost.  It keeps the cost lower for the bulk of the individuals.    My view is that it's not significant for a given band to be used for a given purpose, rather each purpose only needs a clear channel allocated, regardless of the band.   We see 3GHz and 5GHz working equally well for the various usage scenarios.

An investment in 2GHz is the highest cost per channel, then 3GHz, with lowest cost per channel in 5GHz.    

Buy that 10-pack of 5GHz NanoBeams and at $26/unit give your ham buddies xmas presents.  They might put you in their will :) .

Joe AE6XE 

K5DLQ
K5DLQ's picture
i can say from experience...

i can say from experience... It's pretty hard to switch primary bands after the fact...  

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